© 2017 - Sonnenschein Region Porsche Club of America (SONPCA)

Tech Session

Yes…Even Porsches need routine upkeep

and maintenance, and sometimes, repairs.

Here’s some TECH TIPS from our current and past SONPCA Newsletters “Zeitschrift”.

Tires 

When it comes to tires size does matter. Well…if some is good, more is better, and too much is just right. Right? Not al- ways. ABS systems as well as traction control systems use wheel speed sensors to detect the speed of each wheel individually. We got a customer complaint of the ABS warning light coming on at 46 mph on a 1997 911C2. The ABS system does two self checks each time the vehicle is started. First the system checks the static components like battery power, warning light condition, and wiring. The second test begins when the vehicle begins to roll. The rolling test looks for signal from the speedometer as well as the wheel speed sensors. Finding the system to be in good condition the system will turn off the ABS light and the ABS system is then online. In the example given above the system finds all in order until road speed reaches 46 mph at which point a speed differential is detected. The problem looks to be the rear tires. The rear tire size in- stalled on the vehicle is a bit too tall resulting in a lower indicated speed compared to the correct size front tire. It takes the 46 mph to go beyond the speed variation percentage programmed into the ABS con- trol unit. When the system sees the rear outrunning the front it shuts the system down and turns on the warning light. You would think a system programmed for a 911 would tolerate the back end outrunning the front, (a little humor for us 911 drivers). The point is that if you deviate from stock tire sizes you really need to do some homework.

General Maintenance 

Most of us take care of our cars as recommended , we wash and wax our machines on the outside and wipe, clean and vacuum the inside. When we have our cars serviced we mainly think about changing the oil and filters. But there are some other things that need to be checked every once in a while. And that is the cars vacuum system. Have you noticed that you are not getting the fuel mile- age you used to get? Is the car getting harder to start or does it hesitate when you step on the gas. Maybe your car doesn't idle right and stalls every once in a while… Well all of these things could be a result of a leaking vacuum system on your car. With today’s cars rolling off the assembly line and with advanced technology and increased emissions regulations, the vacuum system is a major player in the every- day operation of your car, unlike those old 55 Chevys that didn't care if the vacuum system worked or not. The previous method of finding leaks was with a gauge or maybe even disconnecting a hose and holding your thumb over it to see if a vacuum was present. But with some of the new methods and technology we can make the process of finding these leaks very simple. Some of this new technology we have here at the shop is a machine that produces a smoke from nitrogen that is pumped into the vacuum system. Just recently a customer brought his car in complaining of starting problems and some kind of exhaust leak noise. We attached the machine to the tail pipe and concluded that there was not exhaust leak, instead we found an air injection plug had come out of the head. Great! One problem solved! For the next problem we hooked up the machine to the intake side to test for vacuum leaks. We found multiple on top of multiple leaks! There had been so many leaks that over the years the car had been tuned and tuned to the point where the car was too lean to run properly because the vacuum system was never considered to be an issue. Once the leaks were fixed and the car adjusted back to original specs, the car started nicely and ran as if it were new. If your car is not running right bring it in for a tune up and a vacuum check. We will get you back on the road in no time. Before I close out this article I would like to touch on the subject of brakes and brake fluid. Too often we forget about our brake pads and especially our brake fluid. Brake pads wear out quicker than we like to admit. Especially if we drive our German sports cars aggressively or take them on the track and get really aggressive. We can’t rely solely on the brake warning system because some- times those warnings come a little too late and we end up getting more than just pads. On the brake fluid side of the house, you should change your brake fluid once a year. This is very important because the brake fluid over time becomes more than just brake fluid. With the fluid heating up and cooling down, moisture tends to gather in the fluid. And with this moisture comes other forms of contamination, like corrosion from the water and a filiform growth that looks like algae which in time will cause more corrosion and eventually clog up the brake lines with growth. So while you are getting a tune up, get your brake pads checked and if you haven't changed your brake fluid in a while, get it changed as well. Have fun and be careful on the road!

Battery 

It can’t be the battery…the lights still work! This is the standard response I get when a car wont start and I ask about the battery condition. Looks can be deceiving! The battery may have enough power to shine the headlights, which draw only a few amps, and still be way short of having enough power to run the starter motor, which may draw 100 amps or more. Should I “jump” start it? Not if you have other options. A small battery charger is a fine addition to any home. Battery chargers come in small sizes so as not to take up that valuable space in the garage, are in- expensive, and fairly easy to use. I recommend something like a 10 amp, automatic shut- off unit available at any local parts or home improvement store. Be sure and take the time to read the manual for proper use and safety precautions as batteries have the potential to be really nasty. Why not just jump start it? If the battery is so low that it wont start the engine then it is too low for the alternator to recharge it in a timely fashion. What this boils down to is that the alternator is designed only to keep a battery fully charged, not re- charge a heavily discharged one. The alternator will do it, but at a price. Each time you use the alternator to recharge a dead battery you get a lot closer to replacing the alternator. Battery chargers are a lot less expensive, but if you must…then… well…my kid needs new shoes so feel free. A discharged battery is potentially a sign of additional problems. If your battery is discharged we need to find out why. Batteries can be checked for problems at most of the chain type parts stores, free of charge. If the battery is found to be good it is time to take a look at the car. If the car has sat unused for a few weeks and the battery is low I would consider this normal. If it has been only a few days, or only overnight I would suspect an abnormally high parasitic draw. The normal parasitic draw, (the drain normally present on a battery to keep the clock, radio station pre-sets, etc.) is around 30ma. With-out getting too technical, for reference, leaving the interior light on which pulls about 500ma, will drain a battery in a bout 24 hours, or less. Alternator problems can leave you in the same fix, but usually show up when driving. The alternator should be checked with a good, fully charged battery. Older cars have the potential for a few other problems like corrosion at various wiring connections, most likely near the battery, and the good old faulty ground connection.

Diagnostics

Diagnostic equipment changes of course as the cars change. There was a time when a multi meter and timing light were “cutting edge”. Those days are long gone. The use of computerized equipment has dictated the use of more exotic test equipment. Porsche began use of self diagnostic electronics in 1986 with the 944 Turbo. The system used a modified relay with a couple of light emitting diodes to “blink” a set of codes stored in the engine management control unit. This system could detect a number of possible faults with the ignition and or fuel injection systems. One drawback of this early system was if you turned the engine off it lost any codes stored during the drive. The next system was introduced in 1988 on the 944S and 928S4. Porsche developed a special tool and a book to go with it to retrieve and decipher the codes. The 1987 944S and 928 S4 could use a 1988 control unit and gain the self diagnostic capability. These systems were also the first in the Porsche line to use adaptive control of the engine management. Adaptive systems could compensate for faulty components to some degree. The system would build a set of nor- mal values for its various sensors and resort to those values in the event of a component failure. As you might imagine that can make my job interesting, the system has a bad component and yet it runs normally. It was at this point that self diagnostic capability became a necessity. The check engine light might be the only clue there was a problem lurking. Porsche introduce the 911 Carrera 4 in 1989. This new 911 type number 964 has more processors than a space shuttle. Diagnostic equipment took a great leap forward with this vehicle. The information displayed by the test equipment was now in English! No more blinking binary codes. This tester would give a display of each system accessible, an indication in the main menu if any problem exists in any given control unit, and added information about the type of problems and the actual values of sensors as well a the ability to operate system drive devices. The price of the equipment kept up with the technology and having the tester cost more than my first two Porsches combined. In about 1995 the Fed’s stepped in and made mandatory the use of the OBD II diagnostic system. This is a generic emissions related fault recognition and diagnostic system. This must be accessible by any OBD II tester. The information available through OBD II is only for emission related failures and does not include any Porsche specific items such as air bag lights, alarm system, heat and a/c systems. Porsche’s system tester II is a PC based tester and is used for the Boxsters, 996’s, and Cayenne’s. This is of course the most sophisticated system so far. The PST II is essential for servicing many areas of the newer vehicles. Until our recent purchase of our PST II we had to send many people to the Porsche Dealer for items such as air bag lights. The dealer always took good care of the customers but a drive to Mobile for the Pensacola area people was inconvenient at best. The PST II is a great addition to our shop and the diagnostic capabilities are excellent. The cost, well that still stings a bit.

Drivers Education (DE)

Its January and only a few people have come to have their car checked out for the drivers education event. It doesn't take long and we can do it while you wait. If you downloaded the forms from the internet you will find the Pre-event Safety Inspection form. Bring that with you when you come to get your inspection done. Scanning over the form you will find that the most obvious things are checked. Do you have any fluid leaking? Do you have a sufficient amount of brake pad left? Are your brakes in good working order. These are not only good daily driving things we should all look at, but also a must for the track where speeds usually exceed normal driving limits. Drivers Education events are de- signed for you “the driver” to get to know your car and how it handles. If these everyday safety items are not working properly, it could be detrimental to you and your car. Now my pitch for the DE Event. If you don't attend this event, if even to watch, you will be missing one of the best driving events our chapter has seen in a long time. Catered BBQ, A real driving track, lots of Porsches. With all of these great elements you cannot go wrong. Jim Eliason has worked hard at organizing this event, and I am sure it will be a “hoot”. Give me a call and let me know you are coming for your Safety Inspection.

Check Engine Lights

Check Engine Lights and On board Diagnostics - I get calls from customers with the check engine light on wanting to know if it is safe to drive the car with the check engine light on. The answer is yes. The check engine light is there to alert you to the fact that a fault has occurred in an OBD II monitored system. OBD II is the on board diagnostic system for emission control related systems. The check engine light should not be ignored. It is not as critical as lets say oil pressure; it is absolutely not safe to drive with an oil pressure warning light on. The same would apply to high engine temperature. It is not safe to drive with a high temperature warning. If you drive an air cooled 911 the belt warning light is critical and should never be ignored as engine damage will occur. The check engine light warns of emission related faults only and would be considered safe to drive and have checked at the first opportunity by a qualified repair facility. The most common check engine fault stored seems to be set by starting the car with the gas cap loose. The system picks up a leak in the evaporative emissions area and triggers the light. Many components are monitored, too many to list.

Tire Pressure

The new Porsches have TMS (tire pressure monitoring system) to indicate to you when any of the tires is under-inflated. A change of season, driving at higher altitude, or merely the ravages of time can lead to the dreaded safety and tire damage concerns caused by under-inflation. Would you like a simple and inexpensive solution? Sure you would. The unassuming letter “N” with anatomic number of 7 is your ticket to longer tire life, superior handling, fuel savings, increased safety and easier maintenance of proper tire pressure. I am speaking of Nitrogen. The Nitrogen atom is substantially larger than anO2 atom and does not escape as easily through porous material such as a rubber tire wall. Deflate your tires to atmospheric pressure, suck out the remaining air to create a vacuum, and refill the tires with pure“ N”. Easy–very easy. A number of Vannoy’s Tires, Inc. centers in our area will perform this operation for $5.00 per tire.

More Power

Need a little more of a boost of adrenalin in your driving experience? The fix is often more power. For the Harley lovers among us, a little extra throaty sound  adds to the visceral experience. Get them both from an upgraded exhaust system. A short weekend of labor, a few tools, and $1,700 can have a Borla Race Exhaust System installed in your Cayman or Boxster. What do you get for the effort and dollars -21.4 extra throaty sounding thoroughbred horses. And who among us can’t use a few extra horses!!  For further information and installation instructions, see:  http://www.caymanclub.net/reviews/showproduct.php?product=173&cat =4 
Tech Session
Home
© 2017 - Sonnenschein Region Porsche Club of America (SONPCA)

Yes…Even Porsches need routine upkeep and

maintenance, and sometimes, repairs.

Here’s some TECH TIPS from our current and past SONPCA Newsletters “Zeitschrift”.

Tires 

When it comes to tires size does matter. Well…if some is good, more is better, and too much is just right. Right? Not al- ways. ABS systems as well as traction control systems use wheel speed sensors to detect the speed of each wheel individually. We got a customer complaint of the ABS warning light coming on at 46 mph on a 1997 911C2. The ABS system does two self checks each time the vehicle is started. First the system checks the static components like battery power, warning light condition, and wiring. The second test begins when the vehicle begins to roll. The rolling test looks for signal from the speedometer as well as the wheel speed sensors. Finding the system to be in good condition the system will turn off the ABS light and the ABS system is then online. In the example given above the system finds all in order until road speed reaches 46 mph at which point a speed differential is detected. The problem looks to be the rear tires. The rear tire size in- stalled on the vehicle is a bit too tall resulting in a lower indicated speed compared to the correct size front tire. It takes the 46 mph to go beyond the speed variation percentage programmed into the ABS con- trol unit. When the system sees the rear outrunning the front it shuts the system down and turns on the warning light. You would think a system programmed for a 911 would tolerate the back end outrunning the front, (a little humor for us 911 drivers). The point is that if you deviate from stock tire sizes you really need to do some homework.

General Maintenance 

Most of us take care of our cars as recommended , we wash and wax our machines on the outside and wipe, clean and vacuum the inside. When we have our cars serviced we mainly think about changing the oil and filters. But there are some other things that need to be checked every once in a while. And that is the cars vacuum system. Have you noticed that you are not getting the fuel mile- age you used to get? Is the car getting harder to start or does it hesitate when you step on the gas. Maybe your car doesn't idle right and stalls every once in a while… Well all of these things could be a result of a leaking vacuum system on your car. With today’s cars rolling off the assembly line and with advanced technology and increased emissions regulations, the vacuum system is a major player in the every- day operation of your car, unlike those old 55 Chevys that didn't care if the vacuum system worked or not. The previous method of finding leaks was with a gauge or maybe even disconnecting a hose and holding your thumb over it to see if a vacuum was present. But with some of the new methods and technology we can make the process of finding these leaks very simple. Some of this new technology we have here at the shop is a machine that produces a smoke from nitrogen that is pumped into the vacuum system. Just recently a customer brought his car in complaining of starting problems and some kind of exhaust leak noise. We attached the machine to the tail pipe and concluded that there was not exhaust leak, instead we found an air injection plug had come out of the head. Great! One problem solved! For the next problem we hooked up the machine to the intake side to test for vacuum leaks. We found multiple on top of multiple leaks! There had been so many leaks that over the years the car had been tuned and tuned to the point where the car was too lean to run properly because the vacuum system was never considered to be an issue. Once the leaks were fixed and the car adjusted back to original specs, the car started nicely and ran as if it were new. If your car is not running right bring it in for a tune up and a vacuum check. We will get you back on the road in no time. Before I close out this article I would like to touch on the subject of brakes and brake fluid. Too often we forget about our brake pads and especially our brake fluid. Brake pads wear out quicker than we like to admit. Especially if we drive our German sports cars aggressively or take them on the track and get really aggressive. We can’t rely solely on the brake warning system because some- times those warnings come a little too late and we end up getting more than just pads. On the brake fluid side of the house, you should change your brake fluid once a year. This is very important because the brake fluid over time becomes more than just brake fluid. With the fluid heating up and cooling down, moisture tends to gather in the fluid. And with this moisture comes other forms of contamination, like corrosion from the water and a filiform growth that looks like algae which in time will cause more corrosion and eventually clog up the brake lines with growth. So while you are getting a tune up, get your brake pads checked and if you haven't changed your brake fluid in a while, get it changed as well. Have fun and be careful on the road!

Battery 

It can’t be the battery…the lights still work! This is the standard response I get when a car wont start and I ask about the battery condition. Looks can be deceiving! The battery may have enough power to shine the headlights, which draw only a few amps, and still be way short of having enough power to run the starter motor, which may draw 100 amps or more. Should I “jump” start it? Not if you have other options. A small battery charger is a fine addition to any home. Battery chargers come in small sizes so as not to take up that valuable space in the garage, are in- expensive, and fairly easy to use. I recommend something like a 10 amp, automatic shut- off unit available at any local parts or home improvement store. Be sure and take the time to read the manual for proper use and safety precautions as batteries have the potential to be really nasty. Why not just jump start it? If the battery is so low that it wont start the engine then it is too low for the alternator to recharge it in a timely fashion. What this boils down to is that the alternator is designed only to keep a battery fully charged, not re- charge a heavily discharged one. The alternator will do it, but at a price. Each time you use the alternator to recharge a dead battery you get a lot closer to replacing the alternator. Battery chargers are a lot less expensive, but if you must…then… well…my kid needs new shoes so feel free. A discharged battery is potentially a sign of additional problems. If your battery is discharged we need to find out why. Batteries can be checked for problems at most of the chain type parts stores, free of charge. If the battery is found to be good it is time to take a look at the car. If the car has sat unused for a few weeks and the battery is low I would consider this normal. If it has been only a few days, or only overnight I would suspect an abnormally high parasitic draw. The normal parasitic draw, (the drain normally present on a battery to keep the clock, radio station pre-sets, etc.) is around 30ma. With-out getting too technical, for reference, leaving the interior light on which pulls about 500ma, will drain a battery in a bout 24 hours, or less. Alternator problems can leave you in the same fix, but usually show up when driving. The alternator should be checked with a good, fully charged battery. Older cars have the potential for a few other problems like corrosion at various wiring connections, most likely near the battery, and the good old faulty ground connection.

Diagnostics

Diagnostic equipment changes of course as the cars change. There was a time when a multi meter and timing light were “cutting edge”. Those days are long gone. The use of computerized equipment has dictated the use of more exotic test equipment. Porsche began use of self diagnostic electronics in 1986 with the 944 Turbo. The system used a modified relay with a couple of light emitting diodes to “blink” a set of codes stored in the engine management control unit. This system could detect a number of possible faults with the ignition and or fuel injection systems. One drawback of this early system was if you turned the engine off it lost any codes stored during the drive. The next system was introduced in 1988 on the 944S and 928S4. Porsche developed a special tool and a book to go with it to retrieve and decipher the codes. The 1987 944S and 928 S4 could use a 1988 control unit and gain the self diagnostic capability. These systems were also the first in the Porsche line to use adaptive control of the engine management. Adaptive systems could compensate for faulty components to some degree. The system would build a set of nor- mal values for its various sensors and resort to those values in the event of a component failure. As you might imagine that can make my job interesting, the system has a bad component and yet it runs normally. It was at this point that self diagnostic capability became a necessity. The check engine light might be the only clue there was a problem lurking. Porsche introduce the 911 Carrera 4 in 1989. This new 911 type number 964 has more processors than a space shuttle. Diagnostic equipment took a great leap forward with this vehicle. The information displayed by the test equipment was now in English! No more blinking binary codes. This tester would give a display of each system accessible, an indication in the main menu if any problem exists in any given control unit, and added information about the type of problems and the actual values of sensors as well a the ability to operate system drive devices. The price of the equipment kept up with the technology and having the tester cost more than my first two Porsches combined. In about 1995 the Fed’s stepped in and made mandatory the use of the OBD II diagnostic system. This is a generic emissions related fault recognition and diagnostic system. This must be accessible by any OBD II tester. The information available through OBD II is only for emission related failures and does not include any Porsche specific items such as air bag lights, alarm system, heat and a/c systems. Porsche’s system tester II is a PC based tester and is used for the Boxsters, 996’s, and Cayenne’s. This is of course the most sophisticated system so far. The PST II is essential for servicing many areas of the newer vehicles. Until our recent purchase of our PST II we had to send many people to the Porsche Dealer for items such as air bag lights. The dealer always took good care of the customers but a drive to Mobile for the Pensacola area people was inconvenient at best. The PST II is a great addition to our shop and the diagnostic capabilities are excellent. The cost, well that still stings a bit.

Drivers Education (DE)

Its January and only a few people have come to have their car checked out for the drivers education event. It doesn't take long and we can do it while you wait. If you downloaded the forms from the internet you will find the Pre-event Safety Inspection form. Bring that with you when you come to get your inspection done. Scanning over the form you will find that the most obvious things are checked. Do you have any fluid leaking? Do you have a sufficient amount of brake pad left? Are your brakes in good working order. These are not only good daily driving things we should all look at, but also a must for the track where speeds usually exceed normal driving limits. Drivers Education events are de- signed for you “the driver” to get to know your car and how it handles. If these everyday safety items are not working properly, it could be detrimental to you and your car. Now my pitch for the DE Event. If you don't attend this event, if even to watch, you will be missing one of the best driving events our chapter has seen in a long time. Catered BBQ, A real driving track, lots of Porsches. With all of these great elements you cannot go wrong. Jim Eliason has worked hard at organizing this event, and I am sure it will be a “hoot”. Give me a call and let me know you are coming for your Safety Inspection.

Check Engine Lights

Check Engine Lights and On board Diagnostics - I get calls from customers with the check engine light on wanting to know if it is safe to drive the car with the check engine light on. The answer is yes. The check engine light is there to alert you to the fact that a fault has occurred in an OBD II monitored system. OBD II is the on board diagnostic system for emission control related systems. The check engine light should not be ignored. It is not as critical as lets say oil pressure; it is absolutely not safe to drive with an oil pressure warning light on. The same would apply to high engine temperature. It is not safe to drive with a high temperature warning. If you drive an air cooled 911 the belt warning light is critical and should never be ignored as engine damage will occur. The check engine light warns of emission related faults only and would be considered safe to drive and have checked at the first opportunity by a qualified repair facility. The most common check engine fault stored seems to be set by starting the car with the gas cap loose. The system picks up a leak in the evaporative emissions area and triggers the light. Many components are monitored, too many to list.

Tire Pressure

The new Porsches have TMS (tire pressure monitoring system) to indicate to you when any of the tires is under-inflated. A change of season, driving at higher altitude, or merely the ravages of time can lead to the dreaded safety and tire damage concerns caused by under- inflation. Would you like a simple and inexpensive solution? Sure you would. The unassuming letter “N” with anatomic number of 7 is your ticket to longer tire life, superior handling, fuel savings, increased safety and easier maintenance of proper tire pressure. I am speaking of Nitrogen. The Nitrogen atom is substantially larger than anO2 atom and does not escape as easily through porous material such as a rubber tire wall. Deflate your tires to atmospheric pressure, suck out the remaining air to create a vacuum, and refill the tires with pure“ N”. Easy–very easy. A number of Vannoy’s Tires, Inc. centers in our area will perform this operation for $5.00 per tire.

More Power

Need a little more of a boost of adrenalin in your driving experience? The fix is often more power. For the Harley lovers among us, a little extra throaty sound  adds to the visceral experience. Get them both from an upgraded exhaust system. A short weekend of labor, a few tools, and $1,700 can have a Borla Race Exhaust System installed in your Cayman or Boxster. What do you get for the effort and dollars - 21.4 extra throaty sounding thoroughbred horses. And who among us can’t use a few extra horses!!  For further information and installation instructions, see:  http://www.caymanclub.net/reviews/showproduct.php?product=173&c at=4

Diagnostics

Diagnostic equipment changes of course as the cars change. There was a time when a multi meter and timing light were “cutting edge”. Those days are long gone. The use of computerized equipment has dictated the use of more exotic test equipment. Porsche began use of self diagnostic electronics in 1986 with the 944 Turbo. The system used a modified relay with a couple of light emitting diodes to “blink” a set of codes stored in the engine management control unit. This system could detect a number of possible faults with the ignition and or fuel injection systems. One drawback of this early system was if you turned the engine off it lost any codes stored during the drive. The next system was introduced in 1988 on the 944S and 928S4. Porsche developed a special tool and a book to go with it to retrieve and decipher the codes. The 1987 944S and 928 S4 could use a 1988 control unit and gain the self diagnostic capability. These systems were also the first in the Porsche line to use adaptive control of the engine management. Adaptive systems could compensate for faulty components to some degree. The system would build a set of nor- mal values for its various sensors and resort to those values in the event of a component failure. As you might imagine that can make my job interesting, the system has a bad component and yet it runs normally. It was at this point that self diagnostic capability became a necessity. The check engine light might be the only clue there was a problem lurking. Porsche introduce the 911 Carrera 4 in 1989. This new 911 type number 964 has more processors than a space shuttle. Diagnostic equipment took a great leap forward with this vehicle. The information displayed by the test equipment was now in English! No more blinking binary codes. This tester would give a display of each system accessible, an indication in the main menu if any problem exists in any given control unit, and added information about the type of problems and the actual values of sensors as well a the ability to operate system drive devices. The price of the equipment kept up with the technology and having the tester cost more than my first two Porsches combined. In about 1995 the Fed’s stepped in and made mandatory the use of the OBD II diagnostic system. This is a generic emissions related fault recognition and diagnostic system. This must be accessible by any OBD II tester. The information available through OBD II is only for emission related failures and does not include any Porsche specific items such as air bag lights, alarm system, heat and a/c systems. Porsche’s system tester II is a PC based tester and is used for the Boxsters, 996’s, and Cayenne’s. This is of course the most sophisticated system so far. The PST II is essential for servicing many areas of the newer vehicles. Until our recent purchase of our PST II we had to send many people to the Porsche Dealer for items such as air bag lights. The dealer always took good care of the customers but a drive to Mobile for the Pensacola area people was inconvenient at best. The PST II is a great addition to our shop and the diagnostic capabilities are excellent. The cost, well that still stings a bit.

Drivers Education (DE)

Its January and only a few people have come to have their car checked out for the drivers education event. It doesn't take long and we can do it while you wait. If you downloaded the forms from the internet you will find the Pre-event Safety Inspection form. Bring that with you when you come to get your inspection done. Scanning over the form you will find that the most obvious things are checked. Do you have any fluid leaking? Do you have a sufficient amount of brake pad left? Are your brakes in good working order. These are not only good daily driving things we should all look at, but also a must for the track where speeds usually exceed normal driving limits. Drivers Education events are de- signed for you “the driver” to get to know your car and how it handles. If these everyday safety items are not working properly, it could be detrimental to you and your car. Now my pitch for the DE Event. If you don't attend this event, if even to watch, you will be missing one of the best driving events our chapter has seen in a long time. Catered BBQ, A real driving track, lots of Porsches. With all of these great elements you cannot go wrong. Jim Eliason has worked hard at organizing this event, and I am sure it will be a “hoot”. Give me a call and let me know you are coming for your Safety Inspection.

Check Engine Lights

Check Engine Lights and On board Diagnostics - I get calls from customers with the check engine light on wanting to know if it is safe to drive the car with the check engine light on. The answer is yes. The check engine light is there to alert you to the fact that a fault has occurred in an OBD II monitored system. OBD II is the on board diagnostic system for emission control related systems. The check engine light should not be ignored. It is not as critical as lets say oil pressure; it is absolutely not safe to drive with an oil pressure warning light on. The same would apply to high engine temperature. It is not safe to drive with a high temperature warning. If you drive an air cooled 911 the belt warning light is critical and should never be ignored as engine damage will occur. The check engine light warns of emission related faults only and would be considered safe to drive and have checked at the first opportunity by a qualified repair facility. The most common check engine fault stored seems to be set by starting the car with the gas cap loose. The system picks up a leak in the evaporative emissions area and triggers the light. Many components are monitored, too many to list.

Tire Pressure

The new Porsches have TMS (tire pressure monitoring system) to indicate to you when any of the tires is under-inflated. A change of season, driving at higher altitude, or merely the ravages of time can lead to the dreaded safety and tire damage concerns caused by under-inflation. Would you like a simple and inexpensive solution? Sure you would. The unassuming letter “N” with anatomic number of 7 is your ticket to longer tire life, superior handling, fuel savings, increased safety and easier maintenance of proper tire pressure. I am speaking of Nitrogen. The Nitrogen atom is substantially larger than anO2 atom and does not escape as easily through porous material such as a rubber tire wall. Deflate your tires to atmospheric pressure, suck out the remaining air to create a vacuum, and refill the tires with pure“ N”. Easy–very easy. A number of Vannoy’s Tires, Inc. centers in our area will perform this operation for $5.00 per tire.

More Power

Need a little more of a boost of adrenalin in your driving experience? The fix is often more power. For the Harley lovers among us, a little extra throaty sound  adds to the visceral experience. Get them both from an upgraded exhaust system. A short weekend of labor, a few tools, and $1,700 can have a Borla Race Exhaust System installed in your Cayman or Boxster. What do you get for the effort and dollars -21.4 extra throaty sounding thoroughbred horses. And who among us can’t use a few extra horses!!  For further information and installation instructions, see:  http://www.caymanclub.net/reviews/showproduct.php?product=173&cat =4 
Tech Session